2013 New Year’s Resolutions for the Federal Government

The folk at economicfreedom.org have a list of New Years resolutions for the U.S. government.

Sure, it's from overseas, but we think these  three are just as applicable over here! 

1.  Lose WeightCut Down on the Spending


With $16 trillion in debt and counting, you’re spending yourself—and our economy—to death. Rather than taking more and more of our resources, increasing the size of the public sector, and crowding out private investment, why not let citizens and businesses spend and invest their own money as they see fit? They do a better job at it. Besides, you’re not just hurting this generation: When you overspend, you’re placing a financial burden on the generations to come.


2. Get OrganizedTax Reform


Your tax system is a mess. In 2011, America’s taxpayers and businesses claimed $1.3 trillion worth of tax credits, deductions, exclusions, and exemptions. That adds up to a lot of hours filling out tax forms instead of spending time with family, learning new skills, or building businesses—an estimated 6.1 billion hours in 2012 alone. Those hours are the equivalent of 3 million full-time jobs. It’s time to get it together: Eliminate loopholes, lower taxes, and free the U.S. from tax chaos.


3.  Cut Down on ClutterDecrease Unnecessary Regulations


There’s just too much red-tape and bureaucracy tying up U.S. businesses in regulatory knots—whether it’s permits, licenses, safety codes, fees, or administrative costs. More than 3,500 new rules were added to the Federal Registerin 2012 alone. The cost in time and money of complying with such regulations can force businesses to lower their wages or even lay off employees. Small businesses find it hard to expand when faced with regulatory expenses of approximately $10,000 per employee. For a fresh start, let’s clean out some of the burdensome clutter and let businesses focus on making better products and better serving their customers.


 

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