A New Tax On The Poor

The Greens' leader, Richard Di Natale, has proposed another tax. This is hardly groundbreaking given the progressive party's penchant for using taxes to conduct their brand of social engineering but this time the targets are Australia's poorest people. The suggested 20% tax on all soft drinks and fruit juices would disproportionately hurt low income earners, who are the largest consumers of soft drinks and who cannot afford the freshly-squeezed, 'no-added-sugar' brands of fruit juice enjoyed by the wealthy. Regressive taxes, like the GST and the Greens' proposed sugar ...

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Reduce Company Taxes Now

Among the many economic reasons to reduce company taxes, we are increasingly falling behind the rest of the world. A growing number of developed nations, including Great Britain, are slashing corporate tax rates in a bid to become more competitive. This is no surprise given the levels of political instability in Europe, the permanent repercussions of the GFC and the possibility of a Brexit in June. Although we have and have had better economic conditions in Australia, we can no longer afford to keep company taxes at their current rates. Depending on mining, housing ...

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Dominic Perrottet: Taxes Destroying Family Aspirations

Statements in Parliament typically condemn tax cuts and praise more spending. This is the root of the ordeal that places hard working taxpayers at the foot of the bill for every policy mistake. So when politicians get it right and address this very problem, they deserve our praise. Dominic Perrottet made a statement to Parliament early in June that refreshingly pointed out the harsh reality of excessive taxation. "Tax increases are not ‘savings’. Tax cuts are not ‘concession’ And letting us keep more of our own money is not a ‘handout’ Mr speaker, ...

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Company Tax Cuts Do Not Reduce Government Revenue

By Joakim Book Jönsson The Coalition finally decided to reduce company tax rates from 30% of accounting profits to 25% in 2026-27. This will be implemented by lowering rates on small businesses first, gradually extending to all companies in Australia. Many are worried however, that a reduction in government revenue will make it harder to fix Australia's debt. The simple response to this concern is that cutting company taxes will increase, rather than decrease, government revenue. As a policy that will create short and long term economic growth, company tax ...

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ALP and Coalition Climate Consensus

For another shining example in this election campaign of how indistinguishable the major parties are on policy, look no further than the ALP/Coalition consensus on emissions reductions.   The mainstream ALP/Coalition narrative is that this massive $10 billion cost on the Australian economy will only be borne by “big business”.   As anyone with the most basic understanding of business or economics already knows, the reality is that either these costs will ultimately be passed on to consumers through higher power bills, or will lead to an increase in capital ...

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International Coalition Against Plain Packaging

Today, May 31st, the World Health Organization (WHO) celebrates NO Tobacco Day and the theme this year is Plain Packaging - the same experiment that Australia tried which comprehensively failed to reduce smoking rates at huge cost. The Australian Taxpayers' Alliance is proud to join 46 free market organizations from 30 countries in a letter to Dr. Margaret Chan Fung Fu-chun Director General of the WHO expressing its strong opposition to plain packaging and its support for all types of IP. Instead of weakening the rights of innovators, creators, and entrepreneurs, ...

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New Multinational Tax an MRRT Style Debacle All Over Again

3 May 2016 Media Release: New Multinational Tax a MRRT Style Debacle All Over Again The Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance, a non-partisan advocacy group, today condemned the decision of the Commonwealth Government to introduce a “Profit Diversion Tax”. “By imposing a short sighted new tax on our most agile and innovative companies, the government has failed to grasp the nature of the 21st century agile economy” said Tim Andrews, Executive Director of the Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance. “With the announced tax estimated to raise $100 million ...

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2016 Budget A Missed Opportunity, Fails To Address The Big Issues

  The Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance, a non-partisan advocacy group representing taxpayers, released the following statement on the 2016-17 Commonwealth Budget: “Despite grand rhetoric, the 2016-17 budget is a timid, low-risk budget that fails to address the fundamental challenges facing the Australian economy, and represents a missed opportunity for the Turnbull Government” said Tim Andrews, Executive Director of the Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance. “While Australian taxpayers welcome the relief given of both some personal income and corporate ...

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ATA Budget Analysis: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

ATA Preliminary Budget Analysis: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly The Good Increase of $80,000 marginal tax threshold to $87,000 Reduction of small business tax rate to 27.5% and turnover threshold increased from $2m to $10m Gradual reduction of corporate tax rate to 25%... The Bad The Debt is Too Damn High! $499 billion in Commonwealth Debt or 29% of GDP. This is over $40,000 a household. Interest on gross government debt is over $1000 per family per year. Revenue up from $396.4 to $416.9 (24-24.2 % of GDP) Spending up $431.5 – $450.6 (26.1-2...

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Analysis: Abolishing Negative Gearing Will Hurt Lowest Earners Most

A new analysis by Michael Potter of the Centre for Independent Studies has revealed that the average benefit of negative gearing is considerably larger for low income earners, and reduces as income increases. In a statement made today, Mr Potter noted that: “Negative gearing abolitionists have been arguing the dollar impact of negative gearing is larger for the rich. However, this is the wrong approach. Many tax provisions provide greater dollar benefits to the rich, including the GST exemption for food, basic healthcare and water. Yet we hear no one arguing for ...

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