From the ground in Hong Kong – the key element missing in reporting

By Eliot Metherell | The Spectator

The protests in Hong Kong have rightly attracted international media attention. Escalating tensions frequently boil over into violence coming from both the police and pro-Beijing triads as well as hardcore elements among the protestors.

My Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance colleague Brian Marlow and I were in the city during Saturday’s the anniversary of the 2014 Umbrella Revolution which lasted for over 2 months. We spoke to locals and expats, as well as foreign students, and many told us the same story.

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Brian Marlow
How Hong Kong hospitals fought to treat police violence victims

By Eliot Metherell | The Spectator

Hundreds of medical personnel from three hospitals across Hong Kong have staged sit-ins this week in resistance to the excessive violence used by police when responding to protests.

The savagery dished out by police was compared to that dished out by the triads in their infamous attack on passengers and protesters in Yuen Long train station.

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Brian Marlow
Is Hong Kong’s proposal to withdraw Extradition Bill a ruse?

By Brian Marlow | The Daily Telegraph

News that Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam has proposed to withdraw the now-infamous Extradition Bill, the catalyst for more than three months of protests in Hong Kong, appears to be a cause for celebration.

Dig a little deeper, however, and you can see that this is nothing more than a thinly veiled ruse designed to convince the United States to avoid imposing further sanctions that would cripple China and limit their expansion.

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Brian Marlow
So we'll hit our renewable energy target by 2020 -- but at what cost?

By Emilie Dye | The Spectator

Their ABC is rejoicing. We’ll hit our renewable energy target by 2020. But at what cost? The Australian government only recently rolled out a $11.7 million energy program to help small businesses assess the prices offered by different energy providers. Small businesses, especially in the hospitality industry, are struggling to keep the lights on. The energy companies are begging the states to allow them to use the resources at their feet.

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Brian Marlow
How to reindustrialise Australia?

BY SATYA MARAR | THE SPECTATOR

The Australian steel producer BlueScope will invest $1 billion in an Ohio-based American steel plant, citing the United States’ energy-friendly policies which have driven power bills down to a third of what Australians pay as a decisive factor. This hasn’t just been good news for American businesses. It has also meant thousands of high-quality jobs in a sector that has long been thought of as resigned to an inevitable decline and end due to automation and competition from developing countries with low labour costs.

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Brian Marlow
Prosecco is just the tip of the EU trade war iceberg

BY SATYA MARAR | THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

If our government isn’t careful, it could end up trading away the rights and interests of Australian businesses and consumers to placate the whims of Brussels-based bureaucrats and social engineers driven by a combination of nanny state fetishism and, ironically enough, old-fashioned European nativism.

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Brian Marlow
Don't Shut Down Debate: Does The ALP Really Want Us To Have Blasphemy Laws?

BY SATYA MARAR | THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

Iranian Ayatollah Khomeni and the despotic Saudi regime found unlikely Australian allies this week in Labor Senators Penny Wong and failed NSW Premier Kristina Keneally. Wong and Keneally smeared conservative political opponents including Liberal Senator Amanda Stoker and Craig Kelly MP for appearing at the Conservative Political Action Conference or CPAC to be held from August 9-11 in Sydney.

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Brian Marlow
Gas reserve is all hot air

BY SATYA MARAR | THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

We’ll never unleash our energy potential if we fall for a policy that discouraged investment over the long term, writes Satya Marar.

Although they might lower power prices at least in the short-term, the Morrison government’s planned export restrictions on gas are a Band-Aid solution which will backfire and cause job losses and long-term damage to the economy, government revenues, and even natural gas supply. They are no substitute for boosting supply by removing unnecessary restrictions on gas extraction pervasive throughout our eastern states.

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Brian Marlow
The High Court’s high-stakes ruling threatens liberty

BY SATYA MARAR | THE SPECTATOR

Conservatives and left-wingers alike should oppose today’s High Court decision which found that the Australian Public Service, specifically the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, had not violated the constitutionally-protected implied freedom of political communication of one of its employees by firing her for tweets which were critical of the government.

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Brian Marlow
An end to parliamentary rorts in one easy step

By Emilie Dye | The Spectator

This week, Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon passionately defended the $46,000 electoral allowance which he, like other MPs, receives from taxpayers each year in order to ‘engage’ with constituents: even though they are allowed to pocket what’s left of the allowance as additional income. This is in addition to his $264,000 annual salary and the over $50,000 he receives for travel.

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Gender equality quotas miss the mark

Satya Marar | The Daily Telegraph

The results of Norway’s ‘gender quota’ law, which states there must be a 40 per cent female quota on corporate boards, has been revealed. It found companies were punished with a profit decline. So is hiring women a bad idea? No quite.

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Brian Marlow
Is low-nicotine tobacco just another WHO smokescreen?

By Satya Marar | Los Angeles Daily News

Could nicotine-free tobacco eliminate the scourge of smoking once and for all? The World Health Organization (WHO) seems to think it could. Now, they’re pointing to research from the Technical University of Dortmund, which is currently developing tobacco with the world’s lowest nicotine levels in hopes of helping smokers quit or reduce their habit. They’re asking for trouble.

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Brian Marlow
Plain packaging: a failed policy export

By Jack Johnstone | LibertyWorks

We all know plain packaging is incredibly unappealing to look at, but statistics are consistently showing that it is also completely useless – and may even have effects that go against its intended outcome of reducing smoking.

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Brian Marlow
Want more women at the top? Don't overtax the ones already there

By Emilie Dye | LibertyWorks

Lowering the 32.5 percent marginal tax rate to 30 percent and abolishing the 37 percent tax bracket for people earning $125,000 to $200,000 helps women. Australian Taxpayers Alliance Policy Director, Satya Marar, published an op-ed this week in the Daily Telegraph pointing out that this tax cut would not only provide Australia’s economy with a much-needed productivity boost. It would also promote women’s workforce participation and would bring more highly educated and qualified women back into the workforce, and reward them with higher paying jobs.

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Queensland’s lockout laws have failed. Will NSW Nannies come clean?

By Emilie Dye | The Spectator

A recent study from Griffith University has found that instead of sobering louts up, lockout laws in Queensland have instead lead to people getting drunker. That’s right. The average blood alcohol content of club customers has increased from .07 per cent to .09 per cent since the implementation of alcohol restrictions. So much for reducing irresponsible drinking to combat alcohol-fuelled violence.

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Keep Sydney safe: rein in the police

By Emilie Dye | The Spectator

Last weekend, Christie Aucamp-Aschutte and a group of friends dancing to the lights of Sydney’s Vivid son et lumière festival with an old boom box were approached by the police and told to ‘move along’ without being allowed to so much as finish their song. Their crime: honestly, no one knows.

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